thenearsightedmonkey:

Dear Students,
This is important.
Sincerely,
Professor Bootsy

From the "Unbored" website:  Drawing tips from the great GARY PANTER!INTRODUCTION
Get a book-size (or paperback-size)d sketchbook. Write your name and date on an early page and maybe think of a name for it — and if you want, write the book’s name there at the front. Make it into your little painful pal. The pain goes away slowly page by page. Fill it up and do another one. It can be hard to get started. Don’t flunk yourself before you get the ball rolling.
You might want to draw more realistically or in perspective or so it looks slick — that’s is possible and there are tricks and procedures for drawing with more realism if you desire it. But drawing very realistically with great finesse can sometimes produce dead uninteresting drawings — relative, that is, to a drawing with heart and charm and effort but no great finesse.
You can make all kinds of rules for your art making, but for starting in a sketchbook, you need to jump in and get over the intimidation part — by messing up a few pages, ripping them out if need be. Waste all the pages you want by drawing a tic tac toe schematic or something, painting them black, just doodle. Every drawing will make you a little better. Every little attempt is a step in the direction of drawing becoming a part of your life.
TIPS

1. Quickly subdivide a page into a bunch of boxes by drawing a set of generally equidistant vertical lines, then a set of horizontal lines so that you have between 6 and 12 boxes or so on the page. In each box, in turn, in the simplest way possible, name every object you can think of and draw each thing in a box, not repeating. If it is fun, keep doing this on following pages until you get tired or can’t think of more nouns. Now you see that you have some kind of ability to typify the objects in your world and that in some sense you can draw anything.
2. Choose one of the objects that came to mind that you drew and devote one page to drawing that object with your eyes closed, starting at the “nose” of the object (in outline or silhouette might be good) and following the contour you see in your mind’s eye, describing to yourself in minute detail what you know about the object. You can use your free hand to keep track of the edge of the paper and ideally your starting point so that you can work your way back to the designated nose. Don’t worry about proportion or good drawing this is all about memory and moving your hand to find the shapes you are remembering. The drawing will be a mess, but if you take your time, you will see that you know a lot more about the object than you thought.

3. Trace some drawings you like to see better what the artist’s pencil or pen is doing. Tracing helps you observe closer. Copy art you like — it can’t hurt.
4. Most people (even your favorite artists) don’t like their drawings as much as they want to. Why? Because it is easy to imagine something better. This is only ambition, which is not a bad thing — but if you can accept what you are doing, of course you will progress quicker to a more satisfying level and also accidentally make perfectly charming drawings even if they embarrass you.
5. Draw a bunch more boxes and walk down a sidewalk or two documenting where the cracks and gum and splotches and leaves and mowed grass bits are on the square. Do a bunch of those. That is how nature arranges and composes stuff. Remember these ideas — they are in your sketchbook.

6. Sit somewhere and draw fast little drawings of people who are far away enough that you can only see the big simple shapes of their coats and bags and arms and hats and feet. Draw a lot of them. People are alike yet not — reduce them to simple and achievable shapes.
7. To get better with figure drawing, get someone to pose — or use photos — and do slow drawing of hands, feet, elbows, knees, and ankles. Drawing all the bones in a skeleton is also good, because it will help you see how the bones in the arms and legs cross each other and affect the arms’ and legs’ exterior shapes. When you draw a head from the side make sure you indicate enough room behind the ears for the brain case.

8. Do line drawings looking for the big shapes, and tonal drawing observing the light situation of your subject — that is, where the light is coming from and where it makes shapes in shade on the form, and where light reflects back onto the dark areas sometimes.
9. To draw the scene in front of you, choose the middle thing in your drawing and put it in the middle of your page — then add on to the drawing from the center of the page out.

10. Don’t worry about a style. It will creep up on you and eventually you will have to undo it in order to go further. Be like a river and accept everything.
Thanks to our pal, M.A.G. for bringing this to our attention

thenearsightedmonkey:

Dear Students,

This is important.

Sincerely,

Professor Bootsy

From the "Unbored" website:  Drawing tips from the great GARY PANTER!

INTRODUCTION

Get a book-size (or paperback-size)d sketchbook. Write your name and date on an early page and maybe think of a name for it — and if you want, write the book’s name there at the front. Make it into your little painful pal. The pain goes away slowly page by page. Fill it up and do another one. It can be hard to get started. Don’t flunk yourself before you get the ball rolling.

You might want to draw more realistically or in perspective or so it looks slick — that’s is possible and there are tricks and procedures for drawing with more realism if you desire it. But drawing very realistically with great finesse can sometimes produce dead uninteresting drawings — relative, that is, to a drawing with heart and charm and effort but no great finesse.

You can make all kinds of rules for your art making, but for starting in a sketchbook, you need to jump in and get over the intimidation part — by messing up a few pages, ripping them out if need be. Waste all the pages you want by drawing a tic tac toe schematic or something, painting them black, just doodle. Every drawing will make you a little better. Every little attempt is a step in the direction of drawing becoming a part of your life.

TIPS

1. Quickly subdivide a page into a bunch of boxes by drawing a set of generally equidistant vertical lines, then a set of horizontal lines so that you have between 6 and 12 boxes or so on the page. In each box, in turn, in the simplest way possible, name every object you can think of and draw each thing in a box, not repeating. If it is fun, keep doing this on following pages until you get tired or can’t think of more nouns. Now you see that you have some kind of ability to typify the objects in your world and that in some sense you can draw anything.

2. Choose one of the objects that came to mind that you drew and devote one page to drawing that object with your eyes closed, starting at the “nose” of the object (in outline or silhouette might be good) and following the contour you see in your mind’s eye, describing to yourself in minute detail what you know about the object. You can use your free hand to keep track of the edge of the paper and ideally your starting point so that you can work your way back to the designated nose. Don’t worry about proportion or good drawing this is all about memory and moving your hand to find the shapes you are remembering. The drawing will be a mess, but if you take your time, you will see that you know a lot more about the object than you thought.

3. Trace some drawings you like to see better what the artist’s pencil or pen is doing. Tracing helps you observe closer. Copy art you like — it can’t hurt.

4. Most people (even your favorite artists) don’t like their drawings as much as they want to. Why? Because it is easy to imagine something better. This is only ambition, which is not a bad thing — but if you can accept what you are doing, of course you will progress quicker to a more satisfying level and also accidentally make perfectly charming drawings even if they embarrass you.

5. Draw a bunch more boxes and walk down a sidewalk or two documenting where the cracks and gum and splotches and leaves and mowed grass bits are on the square. Do a bunch of those. That is how nature arranges and composes stuff. Remember these ideas — they are in your sketchbook.

6. Sit somewhere and draw fast little drawings of people who are far away enough that you can only see the big simple shapes of their coats and bags and arms and hats and feet. Draw a lot of them. People are alike yet not — reduce them to simple and achievable shapes.

7. To get better with figure drawing, get someone to pose — or use photos — and do slow drawing of hands, feet, elbows, knees, and ankles. Drawing all the bones in a skeleton is also good, because it will help you see how the bones in the arms and legs cross each other and affect the arms’ and legs’ exterior shapes. When you draw a head from the side make sure you indicate enough room behind the ears for the brain case.

8. Do line drawings looking for the big shapes, and tonal drawing observing the light situation of your subject — that is, where the light is coming from and where it makes shapes in shade on the form, and where light reflects back onto the dark areas sometimes.

9. To draw the scene in front of you, choose the middle thing in your drawing and put it in the middle of your page — then add on to the drawing from the center of the page out.

10. Don’t worry about a style. It will creep up on you and eventually you will have to undo it in order to go further. Be like a river and accept everything.

Thanks to our pal, M.A.G. for bringing this to our attention

thenearsightedmonkey:

"You should have known this was going to happen."

square-wax:

Count Five - Psychotic Reaction, 1967

Psychotic reaction to the weekend countdown.

nomoreliteraryheroes:

A very human way of making life more bearable. 
Yes. That.

nomoreliteraryheroes:

A very human way of making life more bearable.

Yes. That.

nomoreliteraryheroes:

theseluckystars:

mysharona1987:

Some of the funniest book dedications ever.

New threat to anyone who’s being mean: “I’ll call you an assh*le on the dedication page of my next book.”

If I had to dedicate a book to anyone, it would be to my dog, who is my silent, patient companion while I write. But these are funnier…

More book dedications should be like these.

Lamont Dozier: When I got to Motown, I had an idea—I wanted to get rid of this stigma of “race music.” There were some nasty events that happened to me as a child, racial things. I figured that music could bring people together. It was that one common denominator that could get around all obstacles, all hatreds or stupid prejudices. With music, in the ’50s, I’d seen people dance, come together. I saw the beginning of something that could be good for the world.

Lamont Dozier tells the stories behind Motown's Greatest HIts

Interview has all kinds of inside info about the artists, like Diana Ross. 

the-emirofgroovefunkistan:

PLEASE MAKE STEPHEN FRY A SIR. KNIGHT HIM RIGHT NOW. BETTER YET: MAKE HIM KING. OF EVERYTHING.

(Source: drunkonstephen, via myfacewasred)

historical-nonfiction:

This clever comic does a series on the history of everyday objects: check them out here or by clicking the comic.

Laszlo Biro, ballpoint pen inventor. 

historical-nonfiction:

This clever comic does a series on the history of everyday objects: check them out here or by clicking the comic.

Laszlo Biro, ballpoint pen inventor. 

if i were your woman

thenearsightedmonkey:

mudwerks:

In-Crowd | Mango Walk

Now playing on the jukebox in The Near-Sighted Monkey Lounge. Thank you mudwerks: for this musical selection. It is a perfect end of the semester skank vehical.

It *is* perfect.

It’s the taking part that matters - Caitlin Moran (The Times, 23 November, 2013)

gossipcom:

Columnist of the year CAITLIN MORAN; ‘It’s the taking part that matters - up to and including the bit where you win’
The Times

I won an award last week, as this page subtly hints. In the cab on the way home, this made me reflect on the entire nature of “awards” and “winning”, as I entered a philosophical fugue state, wearing only one shoe, knocking back the free miniature gin from the goody bag while taking 900 selfies of the award wedged in my mouth.

Read More

This is hilarious.

sarahbattersby:

jonathanbogart:

dooeytwo:

lucyknisley:

Goofing around with the winter grumps in my sketchbook.

Lucy Knisley does important work.

Anyone who chops these images up to use them as “creative” responses had better link back to Lucy.

Delightful.

Brill.

jessandlen:

uptightcitizen:

corypalmer:

britajames:

claireayoublaughingatthings:

avcnyc:

ohthatsdope:

iamayoungfeminist:

blvcknvy:

Licia Ronzulli, member of the European Parliament, has been taking her daughter Vittoria to the Parliament sessions for two years now.

 

I’m sorry but women get shit done. In fact, not sorry. 

One day that little girl will either kill us or rule us.

Instant re-blog

Awesome! 

The first time I saw this a while back, I just thought “huh, cool.” But it really just hit me what immersion like this can really do during those developmental years. This little girl will have Parliamentary procedure in her bones. That’s crazy. And still very cool.

Hey, look what happens when people don’t make a big deal out if stuff like this. Guess what? A big deal does not get made. There would be a shitstorm if someone tried to do this in America. The mother in question would also be expected to either quit her job or find daycare.

One of my best friends took the time to warn her employer that she was pregnant and get them to agree to a set up that would be beneficial to both her and the company. After the baby came and it came time to make good, the company pulled out and said it was because it wasn’t fair to other people. She was gradually forced out of her job and my friend went from managing a successful store to having to endure a debate over whether they were going to pay her the top wage for a cashier.

I say this from experience and I have way more instances to back this up: The grocery store that rhymes with Raider Moe’s is a misogynist boys’ club that literally hates women.

Important!

(via paulftompkins)

a-nxioushearts:

radolescence:

sweet-phobia:

love this

fuck, I hope someone who sees this today really needed it

Wow love this

a-nxioushearts:

radolescence:

sweet-phobia:

love this

fuck, I hope someone who sees this today really needed it

Wow love this

(Source: dutchster, via myfacewasred)